The Department of Computer Science will offer an excellent computer science education in a personal environment. Students, faculty, and staff will engage in extracurricular activities that enrich the learning experience and offer opportunities to interact with peers. The Faculty and Staff will dedicate themselves to preparing our students for successful careers, life-long learning, and citizenship.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog. A program map, which provides a guide for students to plan their course of study, is available for download in the Courses tab below.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    Our undergraduate B.S. in Computer Science program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.  The program provides students with computer science foundations and cutting edge technical skills needed to succeed in today's Information Technology job market. The program also provides an excellent basis for graduate education in CS and other disciplines.

    Program Location

    Carrollton Campus

    Method of Delivery

    In-residence

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    This program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

    Program Accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 120

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    Downloads

    General

    • CS-1301 - Computer Science I

      This course explores the three fundamental aspects of computer science--theory, abstraction, and design--as the students develop moderately complex software in a high-level programming language. It will emphasize problem solving, algorithm development, and object-oriented design and programming. This course may not be attempted more than three times without department approval.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • CS-1302 - Computer Science II

      This course continues the exploration of theory, abstraction, and design in computer science as the students develop more complex software in a high-level programming language. This course may not be attempted more than two times without department approval.

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    • CS-2100 - Introduction to Web Development

      An introduction to the design and implementation of web pages and sites: foundations of human-computer interaction; development processes; interface, site and navigation design; markup and style-sheet languages; site evaluation; introduction to client-side scripting.

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    • MATH-1113 - Precalculus

      This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. Credit for this course is not allowed if the student already has credit for MATH 1634. If course is taken through eCore, course is 3 credit hours.

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    • MATH-1634 - Calculus I

      The first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Limits, applications of derivatives to problems in geometry and the sciences (physical and behavioral). Problems which lead to anti-derivatives.

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    • MATH-2063 - Introductory Statistics

      (Non-credit for mathematics major or minor). A non-calculus based introduction to methods of descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous distributions, and other fundamental concepts or statistics. variance will be covered. Appropriate technology, a graphing calculator or statistical software package, will be used.

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    • MATH-2644 - Calculus II

      A continuation of MATH 1634. The definite integral and applications, calculus of transcendental functions, standard techniques of integration, sequences and series.

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    Major Required

    3 Additional 4000 level CS courses in addition to the ones below.

    • CS-3110 - System Architecture

      An introduction to systems architecture and its impact on software execution. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, assembly level machine organization, memory systems organization, I/O and communication, and CPU implementation.

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    • CS-3151 - Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I

      An integrated approach to the study of data structures, algorithm analysis, and discrete mathematics. Topics include induction and recursion, time and space complexity, and big-O notation, propositional logic, proof techniques, sorting, mathematical properties of data structures, including lists.

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    • CS-3152 - Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics II

      A continuation of CS 3151. Topics include sets, relations and functions, graphs, state spaces and search techniques; automata, regular expressions, and context free grammars; NP-completeness.

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    • CS-3201 - Program Construction I

      The craft and science of software construction: effective practices, principles, and patterns for building correct, understandable, testable and maintainable object-oriented code.

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    • CS-3202 - Program Construction II

      A continuation of CS 3201: effective practices, principles and patterns for building correct, understandable, testable, and maintainable code using a variety of programming paradigms, programming languages and system architectures.

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    • CS-3211 - Software Engineering I

      An introduction to the software development life cycle and contemporary software development methods. This course places special emphasis on object-oriented systems. Students are expected to complete a medium scale software project.

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    • CS-3212 - Software Engineering II

      Software development methods for large scale systems. Management of software development projects. Software engineering standards. Students are expected to complete a large scale software project.

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    • CS-3230 - Information Management

      This course covers principles of database systems. Topics include theory of relational databases, database design techniques, database query languages, transaction processing, distributed databases, privacy and civil liberties. Students are expected to complete a project in database design, administration, and development.

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    • CS-3270 - Intelligent Systems

      Application and survey of problem-solving methods in artificial intelligence with emphasis on heuristic program- ming, production systems, neural networks, agents, social implications of computing, and professional ethics and responsibilities.

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    • CS-3280 - Systems Programming

      Introduction to system-level software development. Topics include OS processes, network communication, file-system organization and manipulation, and script programming.

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    • CS-4225 - Distributed and Cloud Computing

      This course introduces the foundations and applications of distributed and cloud computing. Topics include multi-threaded programming, scheduling, synchronization, network architecture, distributed computing and distributed services, cloud services, and internet-scale computing.

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    • CS-4982 - Computing Capstone

      This course integrates core topics of computer science body of knowledge, teamwork, and professional practices through the implementation of a large scale project.

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    • ENGL-3405 - Professional and Technical Writing

      Intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids.

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    Major Selects

    Select one from the following: MATH 2853, MATH 3303, MATH 4003, MATH 4103, MATH 4153
    Area D: One of the following sequences required: BIOL 1107+1107L, BIOL 1108+1108L or CHEM 1211+1211L, CHEM 1212+1212L or PHYS 2211+2211L, 2212+2212L
    Select one not taken in Area D from the following: BIOL 1107+1107L, CHEM 1211+1211L, PHYS 2211+2211L

    • BIOL-1107 - Principles of Biology I

      This course is designed for the biology major, other science majors, and secondary science majors. An integrated plant- animal approach, including form, function, and development of organisms, their systematics, ecology and evolution. Students must enroll in BIOL 1107L in the same term.

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    • CHEM-1211 - Principles of Chemistry I

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. MATH 1113 and CHEM 1211L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-1212 - Principles of Chemistry II

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics, kinetics and electricity. Corequisite: CHEM 1212L

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    • MATH-2853 - Elementary Linear Algebra

      A concrete, applied approach to matrix theory and linear algebra. Topics include matrices and their connection to systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and diagonalization. The use of mathematical software is a component of the course.

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    • MATH-3303 - Ordinary Differential Equations

      Modeling with and solutions of ordinary differential equations, including operators, Laplace transforms, and series; systems of ODE's, and numerical approximations.

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    • MATH-4003 - Dynamical Systems

      A computational introduction to dynamical systems. Topics include discrete and continuous systems, bifurcations, stability, and chaos: Julia and Mandelbrot sets, applications to biology and physics.

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    • MATH-4103 - Operations Research

      An introduction to linear and nonlinear programming. Topics include the formulation of linear programming models; the simplex method, duality and sensitivity; integer programming, the use of spreadsheets and software applications to solve constrained optimization problems.

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    • MATH-4153 - Applied Mathematical Modeling

      An introduction to the creation and use of mathematical models. Mathematical techniques will be developed and applied to real systems in areas including chemistry, biology, physics and economics. Students will be expected to make written and oral presentations in a professional manner. This course will emphasize the creation and testing of models and discussions of errors and forecasting. Students will work on projects singly and as part of a group.

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    • PHYS-2212 - Principles of Physics II

      An introductory course that will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary calculus will be used.

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  • Faculty
  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

    Admission Process Checklist

    1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
    2. Review important deadlines:
      • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
      • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
      • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
        See program specific calendars here
    3. Complete online application
      Undergraduate Admissions Guide

      Undergraduate Application

      Undergraduate International Application

    4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
    5. Submit official documents

      Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

      Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
      Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
      University of West Georgia
      1601 Maple Street
      Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
    6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
    7. Check the status of your application

  • Dates

    Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate only), Financial Aid, Fee Payments, Registration, Start/End of term, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

  • Objectives

    Students graduating with a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of West Georgia will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts of computer science, software engineering, science and mathematics in the modeling and design of computer systems.
    • Demonstrate an ability to implement, test, and deploy a computer-based system applying current and emerging methodologies and technologies.
    • Demonstrate an ability to apply ethical and professional standards to ensure computing benefits individuals and society as a whole.
    • Effectively function as a member of a team engaged in the process of modeling, designing, implementing, testing, and deploying of computer-based systems.